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Archive for the ‘Tasmania’ Category

Tas Govt promises release of extra 3,300ML of irrigation water from Lake Crescent, Clyde Valley

Posted by waterweek on 17 October 2007

Tasmanian farmers welcomed the State Government’s promise to release an extra 3,300 megalitres of irrigation water from Lake Crescent, wrote Alison Ribbon in The Mercury (9/10/2007).

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Posted in Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0415 | Leave a Comment »

Tas gets pre-election Drought Assistance Bus; travelling experts advising farmers

Posted by waterweek on 11 October 2007

The Australian Government Drought Assistance Bus would be advising farmers in Tasmania in September, reported The Mercury (5/9/2007, p.22). Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in australia, Energy, Tasmania, water, Water Week Vol 0414 | Leave a Comment »

Old friendship between Greens leader Brown and Peter Garrett ends over Tamar Valley pulp mill; Brown to fight on

Posted by waterweek on 10 October 2007

Australian Greens leader Bob Brown had turned his back on former environmental pin-up boy and old friend Peter Garrett, wrote Mark Worley in The Mercury (6/10/2007).

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Posted in Federal Election, Policy, Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0414 | Leave a Comment »

Hydro Tasmania will continue to import significantly across Basslink as it seeks to protect storages following a dry winter across the state

Posted by waterweek on 10 October 2007

Hydro Tasmania’s storages continue to feel the brunt of below average rainfall just two months into the new financial year and despite good rains in the first half of August. While inflows were above average for August, early September inflows were well below average and the indications are that this trend will continue for the month without significant spring falls. Hydro Tasmania will continue to import significantly across Basslink as it continues to protect storages following a dry winter across the State, said a Hydro Tasmania release.

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Posted in Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0414 | Leave a Comment »

Outraged Greens opt for open ticket as Labor and Coalition support Gunns

Posted by waterweek on 10 October 2007

Federal Environmental Minister Malcolm Turnbull said it was not appropriate for the commonwealth to assess the greenhouse gas emissions from individual projects, such as the proposed pulp mill in Tasmania, as this was better dealt with by a national emissions trading regime, reported The Australian Financial Review (5/10/2007, p. 10).

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Posted in Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0414 | Leave a Comment »

Gunns now has legal standing to go on destroying for the next 50yrs what remains of Tas old-growth forests, SMH writer says

Posted by waterweek on 10 October 2007

Gunns was the company that dominated Tasmania’s forestry industry, and Tasmania was the only Australian state that still clear-felled its native forests, turned its eucalypts into chips and incinerated the rest, wrote Alan Ramsey in The Sydney Morning Herald (6/10/2007, p.33).

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Posted in Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0414 | Leave a Comment »

Greens Party MP Milne says proposed tax legislation will harm farmers, needs appropriate scientific scrutiny

Posted by waterweek on 10 October 2007

Christine Milne MP (Senator, Greens Party) stated that a whole-of-government approach to climate change was needed, on 20 September 2007.

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Posted in Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0414 | Leave a Comment »

Chaffey Dam augmentation project to improve water supply security for Tamworth and Peel Valley irrigators: contingent on NSW government and other stakeholders meeting funding shares

Posted by waterweek on 10 October 2007

Malcolm Turnbull MP (Minister for the Environment and Water Resources) answering a question from Tony Windsor MP (Independent) as to whether the minister could guarantee to the people of Tamworth that the upgrade to the Chaffey Dam would proceed, stated that the contribution of $6½ million to the Chaffey Dam augmentation project would improve water supply security for Tamworth and Peel Valley irrigators.

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Posted in nsw, Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0414 | Leave a Comment »

Gunns gains from commodity price boom: plan based on $US520 a tonne; and wood pulp prices now $US720 a tonne

Posted by waterweek on 9 October 2007

According to Malcolm Maiden, in The Age, (5/10/2007, p. B1), stripped of emotion, the pulp mill that Gunns will now almost certainly build on the banks of the Tamar River in Tasmania was part of the commodity price boom that has been carrying the Australian economy along for half a decade. Pulp prices have been steadily rising since 2001 and 2002, off a base of about $US500 a tonne, to a spot quote of $US720 a tonne.

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Posted in Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0414 | Leave a Comment »

Release of water to Clyde River irrigators; Emergency provision of water for Bothwell town, domestic and stock supplies

Posted by waterweek on 8 October 2007

Primary Industries Minister David Llewellyn said in a state­ment that he would make an announcement about the release of water to Clyde River irrigators “later in the week”. In an earlier statement, Opposition Leader Will Hodgman said: “It has been almost a week since the Primary Industries Minister, David Llewel­lyn, announced an emer­gency provision of water for Bothwell town, domes­tic and stock supplies.The Mercury, 3/10/2007, p. 13

Posted in Tasmania, water, Water Week Vol 0414 | Leave a Comment »

Approval Decision – Gunns pulp mill: Turnbull appoints pulp mill police: if Gunns fails, then tertiary treatment of effluent, and no start without Ministers approval

Posted by waterweek on 8 October 2007

An independent site supervisor (“the Independent Supervisor”) will be appointed to verify action, , managed by an Independent Expert Group, and provided by Gunns Limited with access to all information and locations required, as appointed as an Inspector under the Act with functions and powers under the Environment Protection and Biodiversity Conservation Regulations 2000 sufficient to ensure appropriate access to all information required for the purpose of the task. Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Tasmania, water, Water Week Vol 0414 | Leave a Comment »

Gunns ordered to measure pollution keep dioxins and furans in the benthic sediments in Commonwealth marine water below850pg TEQ/kg

Posted by waterweek on 8 October 2007

The Chief Scientist’s report said if results of the modelling indicate that effluent hydrodynamics and deposition will result in chemicals reaching trigger levels, Gunns must change the design and operation of the effluent pipeline and diffuser; and must also: Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Tasmania, water, Water Week Vol 0414 | Leave a Comment »

New TAFE Tasmania course allows graduates to control multi-billion-dollar power stations

Posted by waterweek on 5 October 2007

Designed in a partnership between Hydro Tasmania and TAFE, the Electricity Supply Industry Generation Training Package (GenTech) gives trainees hands-on experience managing massive water and power flows, reported The Mercury, (25/9/2007, p.18). Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in australia, Energy, Tasmania, water, Water Week Vol 0414 | Leave a Comment »

Rainfall in SW Tas likely to increase 10pc, taking in important Hydro catchment areas; but others areas get 10-20pc less, says new CSIRO model

Posted by waterweek on 5 October 2007

According to Peter Boyer, CSIRO Division of Marine and Atmospheric Research scientists have developed a variable-resolution climate model capable of providing fine resolution over a rela­tively small area like Tasmania, reported The Mercury (2/10/2007, p.17). Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in australia, Emissions, Energy, Tasmania, water, Water Week Vol 0414 | Leave a Comment »

Gunns Tasmania mill’s fate hangs in balance: Fed Cabinet refuses to make a decision after Government chief scientist gives thumbs down to mill in current form; Gunns told to agree to more stringent effluent controls

Posted by waterweek on 3 October 2007

According to Sue Neales, chief reporter of The Mercury, (27/09/2007, p.5), Federal Cabinet refused to make a decision on the future of the world’s largest pulp mill, the $1.9 billion Tasmanian mill, after being told last week that government chief scientist Jim Peacock had recommended, after a four-week inquiry, that the Federal Government not approve the mill in its current form unless proponent Gunns agreed to incorporate more stringent effluent controls.

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Posted in Federal Election, Policy, Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0413 | Leave a Comment »

Tas opens water coffers for thirsty town: emergency supplies ordered from Lake Crescent in the Clyde River catchment of central Tasmania for town of Bothwell, set to run out of water in two weeks

Posted by waterweek on 2 October 2007

With water to the town of Bothwell set to run out in two weeks, the state government had declared a water supply emergency in the Clyde River catchment of central Tasmania, to save Bothwell residents having to truck drinking water to meet town’s needs, reported The Mercury, (27/09/2007, p.13).

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Posted in Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0413 | Leave a Comment »

Tas’s Kingborough Council inaugural energy challenge fails to produce real drop in energy consumption; but a useful exercise anyway, says Mayor

Posted by waterweek on 2 October 2007

A cold and damp weekend stopped Kingborough Council’s inaugural energy challenge achieving its objective, reported The Mercury (14/8/2007, p.7).

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Posted in Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0413 | Leave a Comment »

Gunns wants 2 million GMt/a of hardwood supply from native forests for its Tas pulp mill

Posted by waterweek on 28 September 2007

As at June 2005, there was a total of 403,256 hectares of gazetted Private Timber Reserves. In addition, excluding Gunns’ owned or managed plantation estate on private land, there was 50,000ha of hardwood plantation and 76,000ha of softwood plantation on private land in Tasmania, reported erisk.net (2/4/2007). Because of the speculative nature of negotiating and purchasing a supply of wood from third party landowners, the average planning horizon for third party private wood supply was typically less than 12 months.

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Posted in Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0413 | Leave a Comment »

Pulp mill in Tasmania to lead to massive deforestation: and 10 million tonnes of greenhouse emissions every year, Greens Senator says

Posted by waterweek on 26 September 2007

Christine Milne, Senator for Tasmania, Australian Greens Party, recorded in the Senate Hansard, Commonwealth of Australia, 11 September 2007 said the Gunns pulp mill in Tasmania has not been assessed for its greenhouse gas emissions.

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Posted in Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0412 | Leave a Comment »

Roundtable costings indicate Tasmanian pulp mill project may cause economic loss to the state; mill does not represent sustainable development for Tasmania, say businesses

Posted by waterweek on 22 September 2007

While Gunns claimed its proposed Tasmanian pulp mill, which will create 290 full-time jobs once fully operational, would add $6.7 billion, or 2.5 per cent to the Tasmanian economy and an additional $894 million in extra tax revenue between 2008 and 2030, a roundtable meeting of local businesses, believing it was absurd for any assessment not to examine the risks and potential negative impacts of the project, commissioned its own study, reported The Australian (23/8/2007, p. 13).

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Posted in Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0411 | Leave a Comment »

Controversy surrounds Gunns Tasmania pulp mill: foresters pressure mill opponents amid suggestions of corruption and secrecy

Posted by waterweek on 20 September 2007

As then Labor leader Mark Latham found out, the politics of Tasmania’s marginal seats, Bass and Braddon, are more quicksand than woodchip, reported The Australian (15/9/2007, p. 26). Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Deforestation, Energy, Plantation forestry, Policy, Tasmania, water, Water Week Vol 0411 | Leave a Comment »

Bell Bay power station in Tas: delivered gas costs estimated at $4.30/GJ; transmission at $1.12/GJ

Posted by waterweek on 20 September 2007

The Bell Bay power station on Tasmania’s north coast commenced operations in 1971 with a 120MW unit and a further 120MW unit was added in 1974, noted ‘Fuel resource, new entry and generation costs in the NEM’, a report by ACIL Tasman for NEMMCO (27/3/2007). Read the rest of this entry »

Posted in Energy, Gas, Hydro, Regulation, Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0411 | Leave a Comment »

“A plan so cunning you could put a tail on it and call it a weasel”: Howard’s support for Tamar pulp mill in Tas

Posted by waterweek on 18 September 2007

The proposed pulp mill in Tasmania’s Tamar Valley was at the forefront of John Howard’s mind because it represented one part of his last-ditch plan to turn the polls around and snatch electoral victory, wrote Dennis Shanahan in The Australian (15/9/2007, p.19).

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Posted in Deforestation, Federal Election, Plantation forestry, Policy, pollution, Project Approvals, Public Opinion, Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0411 | Leave a Comment »

Tasmanian pulp mill debate crosses Strait to create ripples in federal politics

Posted by waterweek on 18 September 2007

The best efforts of both major parties to quarantine the Tamar Valley pulp mill debate south of Bass Strait continued to fail dismally, according to Matthew Denholm reported The Australian (15/9/2007, p.31).
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Posted in Deforestation, Federal Election, Plantation forestry, Policy, Project Approvals, Public Opinion, Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0411 | Leave a Comment »

Details of complex history of Tasmanian pulp mill assessment laid bare in Legislative Council

Posted by waterweek on 18 September 2007

The history of the hearings on the application for a permit to construct a proposed pulp mill by Gunns was detailed by T.L. Martin in the Tasmanian Legislative Council on 28 August 2007.

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Posted in Deforestation, Federal Election, Plantation forestry, Policy, Project Approvals, Public Opinion, Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0411 | Leave a Comment »

Tasmania’s Hydro-Electric Commission must supply unknown quantity of water to unknown number of irrigators along Ouse and Lake rivers

Posted by waterweek on 18 September 2007

Riparian land-holders on the Lake River below Woods Lake and the Ouse River below Waddamana had a statutory right to take water for irrigation under the Electricity Supply Industry Restructuring (Savings and Transitional Provisions) Act 1995 and therefore did not require a water licence under the Water Management Act 1999, said Doug Parkinson, Leader of the Government in the Council, in the Tasmanian Legislative Council on 30 August 2007.

Fifty year old agreement still honoured: “When the Poatina power development was approved in 1957,” Parkinson said, “one of the mitigating actions negotiated for diverting the water in Great Lake to the north was a statutory obligation on the Hydro-Electric Commission to make water available to riparian irrigators along the Ouse and Lake rivers. These obligations were carried over at corporatisation of the Hydro-Electric Commission.”

Legislation cited: According to Parkinson the current statutory requirement was the Electricity Supply Industry Restructuring (Savings and Transitional Provisions) Act 1995 Division 2, the Lake River and River Ouse, Section 16(1), which laid down that owners of land within boundaries specified in the section had to be provided with “water reasonably required for the irrigation of that land from the beds of the Lake River and the River Ouse and the channels of the Lawrenny Irrigation Works that have continued in existence since 1 November 1957 or earlier”.

Boundaries defined: The land defined in the legislation was:

• the area of land in the Parish of Lawrenny, County of Cumberland, bounded … on the south-west by the River Derwent from its confluence with the River Ouse to its confluence with the River Clyde thence on the east by the River Clyde in a general northerly direction to the Lyell Highway thence on the north-east in a general north-westerly direction by that highway to the River Ouse and thence on the west by the River Ouse in a general southerly direction to the point of commencement; and

• the riparian tenements situated on the Lake River and the River Ouse below Waddamana.

Number and capacity of pumps only limit: “Under the terms of the original Loan (Hydro-Electric Commission) Act 1957, Hydro Tasmania is required to maintain Lake and Ouse river flows for reasonable irrigation,” Parkinson said. “In practical terms, irrigators who are covered by the act were only limited by their ability to remove water from the river – that is, the number and capacity of their pumps. As water licences are not required it is not known exactly how many irrigators are extracting water from the Lake and Ouse rivers and in what quantities. In addition, not all landowners on the Lake and Ouse rivers extract a similar volume of water for irrigation purposes each year due to variations in farming practices.”

Reference: Doug Parkinson, Leader of the Government in the Council, Member for Wellington, Legislative Council, Parliament of Tasmania, Tasmania, 30 August 2007.

Posted in Energy, Hydro, Irrigation, Law, Policy, Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0411 | Leave a Comment »

98.7 per cent of poll respondents say “No” to Tasmanian pulp mill

Posted by waterweek on 17 September 2007

An online reader poll this week had revealed an unprec­edented level of opposition to the pro­posed Tasmanian pulp mill, reported the Wentworth Courier (12/9/2007, p. 7).

Rigorous assessment to be undertaken: “There were 776 responses to our question ‘Should the pulp mill pro­ceed in the Tamar Valley?’ with 98.7 per cent of voters answering ‘No’,” the newspaper reported. “In response to the poll, the federal Environment Minister, Malcolm Turnbull, said voters in Wentworth would expect him to undertake a com­prehensive environmental assessment of the project. He said his extended six-week deadline had allowed for that. ‘The assessment process I have put in place with an independent review by the chief scientist has now been acknowledged, even by opponents of the pulp mill, as a thorough and rigor­ous one,’ Mr Turnbull said.”

Fast-tracking challenged: “The figures echo a recent Newspoll in the northern Tasmanian electorate of Bass,” the Wentworth Courier said. “Of a sample of 400 voters the poll found that more than half were against the construction of the mill. Debate over the $2 billion Gunns pulp mill has been played out in Malcolm Turnbull’s electorate after a critical advertisement funded by businessman Geoffrey Cousins. Mr Cousins’ advertisement in the Courier challenged the MP over fast-tracking the environmental assess­ment process of the mill.”

Mill “will have no significant impact” say owners: “Pulp mill company Gunns responded with its own full-page advertisement last week, claiming the residents of Wentworth were being subjected to a campaign of misinformation,” the newspaper reported. “Gunns said the project would have no signifi­cant impact on the local environment or the tourism and wine industries. In a forum at Waverley RSL last week, Greens leader Bob Brown con­demned Gunns’ comments, saying the mill was ‘an absolute assault on the atmosphere of this planet’.”

Wentworth Courier, 12/9/2007, p. 7

Posted in Federal Election, Project Approvals, Public Opinion, Tasmania, Water Week Vol 0411 | Leave a Comment »

Legal septic tank outfall stops water qual­ity testing at Tasmanian beach: consistently high enterococci levels

Posted by waterweek on 14 September 2007

Recreational water qual­ity testing at Jones Bay, Lewi­sham, had been stopped because it continued to show consistently high enterococci levels, reported The Mercury (7/9/2007, p. 9).

Pub has right to discharge: Sorell Council recently resolved to abandon water qual­ity testing because a septic tank outfall from Lewisham Tavern discharged directly into Pitt Water off Jones Bay. Enterococci testing indi­cates levels of faecal contami­nation. A council report said generally consistent high en­terococci levels detected in Jones Bay probably reflected the presence of primary treated septic waste from le­gally sanctioned discharges of effluent from the tavern. The council also has decided to drop testing at Okines Beach, Dodges Ferry, because little swimming occured there.

The Mercury, 7/9/2007, p. 9

Posted in pollution, Tasmania, water, Water Week Vol 0411 | 1 Comment »