Water Week

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41,415 species on the IUCN Red List and 16,306 were threatened with ex­tinction, up from 16,118 last year

Posted by waterweek on 20 September 2007

The global extinction crisis con­tinued with the World Conser­vation Union (IUCN) Red List of threatened species, released yes­terday, showing apes, vultures and dolphins all in danger, reported The Courier Mail (14/9/2007, p.38).

Human survival depends on protecting biodiversity: World Conservation Union scientists said there were 41,415 species on the IUCN Red List and 16,306 were threatened with ex­tinction, up from 16,118 last year. IUCN director-general Julia Marton-Lefevre said the list showed efforts to protect species were not enough. “The rate of biodiversity loss is increasing and we need now to significantly reduce it and stave off this global extinc­tion crisis,” she said. “This can be done but only with a concerted effort by all levels of society.” IUCN species program head Jane Smart said humans were inextricably linked with biodiv­ersity and ultimately its protec­tion meant our own survival.

List keeps growing: The total number of birds on the IUCN Red List was 9956, with 1217 listed as threatened, The Courier Mail said. Vul­tures in Africa and Asia had declined, with particular im­pacts from the drug Diclofenac, an anti-inflammatory used to treat livestock. A major assessment of Mexican and North American reptiles saw 723 added to the IUCN Red List, taking the total to 738 reptiles listed for this region. Of these, 90 were threatened with extinction. There were now 12,043 plants on the list, with 8447 threatened.

The Courier Mail, 14/9/2007, p. 38

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